“Alex Highton’s music – a rich blend of melody and soul – calls on a deep, melting pot of influences.

From Talking Heads and Penguin Cafe Orchestra to the Band and David Ackles, his music collection shows off a love for joyful eclectism, reflected in his own creations.

Alex’s story is one of loss during his twenties due to bad decisions and car-crash relationships before finally finding salvation in meeting his future wife and a love for the songwriting craft.

His debut album – Woodditton Wives Club – received extensive support from BBC6 Music and BBC Introducing (amongst others) and a US tour followed, taking in New York, Austin (SXSW) and LA, with more dates in Germany, Holland and Belgium, as well as slots at Camp Bestival and Wilderness Festival.

His follow up Nobody Knows Anything is more ambitious, still displaying a love for a wry lyric and infectious hook but with a deeper sound and wider instrumentation. Meet him in our 30 seconds interview below…

I first started writing music because…
I’ve no idea. My dad bought me a guitar when I was thirteen and it just lay around in my bedroom staring at me with accusing eyes of neglect for years. Then one day, for reasons unbeknown to me, I decided to pick it up and learn Mother Nature’s Son by the Beatles. The next day I wrote a song and I’ve not really stopped since.

I have been making music since…
I was seventeen. Although it took me a long time to get serious about it. I got a bit lost in my twenties. Luckily I met a good woman and she turned it all around.

My music is…
Just me messing about, trying to interest/amuse myself. In the past, when I’ve maybe had some issues, it’s been a little like therapy I suppose.

You’ll like my music if you listen to…
I’m not sure. I listen to a lot of different music myself and try to throw it all in there in some way or other. Reviews tend to mention people like Elliott Smith, Sufjan Stevens, I Am Kloot, Paul McCartney, Harry Nilsson, that sort of stuff. Every time I see a comparison like this I’m of course proper flattered. Then I tell my wife about it and she brings me down to earth (which is of course how it should be).

My favourite venue is…
The Rocket House in Brussels. Great venue, invite only shows put on by really nice people who do everything they can to look after you. I enjoyed playing for these guys very much.

Music is important because…
It’s helped me in every moment of my life. It’s got so many facets to the way it can transform your thinking or your mood. Music helps you connect with like-minded (and sometimes not) people, helps you make friends, it can be journey of discovery, be therapy, it’s anything you want it to be really (I sound a bit new age/self help here – apologies).

Mostly it’s just a good laugh – especially when I’m embarrassing my kids dancing in the kitchen with Mrs H.

My biggest inspiration is…
Well I’d say I’ve been in some kind of existential crisis ever since I was about ten and my dad tried to explain the concept of nihilism to me. I think we were on this long car trip to through Italy, listening to Chuck Berry and me thinking but surely if Chuck exists life MUST have meaning…

Other than that, my family obviously.

My dream collaboration would be…
Do they have to be alive? Can I have a band? I’d have the Meters as my backing band. That would be ace. Harry Nilsson, would be the one though. He just didn’t give a toss, ruined his career following his muse. I love that. He was just in it for the music (and the women … and the drugs … and the booze).

To work with today? Right now? Here We Go Magic. Really amazing band, interesting, off the wall, great songs. If you don’t know them check them out. If you do know them, I mean you actually KNOW them, please do tell them that a little known singer-songwriter from a small village in Cambridgeshire is up for collaboration.

To try me out, listen to my song…
This is tricky. Just one shot and I’ve got to grab your attention? It Falls Together off the new album. If you don’t like that try Sunlight Burns Your Skin – that’s less weird.

If I wasn’t making music I’d be…
Really unhappy – although I’d have a lot more free time on my hands.

I might be a salesman or work in a haberdasher or chapeau shop. I could do that. Depending on the hours of course.

In 10 years time I want to be…
Playing up-front for Everton. In the hole just behind the front two. I see myself as a playmaker, more creative than physical. I won’t be tracking back much.

alexhighton.co.uk
twitter.com/alexhighton
facebook.com/alexhightonmusic”

http://www.m-magazine.co.uk/genres/folk/30-seconds-interview-alex-highton/